Nice High Herbal photos

Check out these high herbal pictures:

Herbal highs.
high herbal
Image by gak
The consumption of herbal supplements is very conspicuous in NZ.

Herbal High stall, Glade Festival, July 2008
high herbal
Image by ali wade

Nice Legal Bud Order photos

A few nice legal bud order images I found:

Seared Sea Scallops Provencale at Blue Heaven
legal bud order
Image by tsand
If you go to Key West and do NOT go to Blue Heaven AND order the scallops, you’re taste buds should seek legal counsel. Serious, it would be a crime.

Nice Legal Bud Black Magic photos

A few nice legal bud black magic images I found:

fae magic 2012
legal bud black magic
Image by mardi grass 2011
Prophetic Conspirators: Psychedelic Water 27>

The mess accumulates and energy swells as adventurous travelers strut toward the promise of a truly psychedelic experience – an indelible climax to the weekend’s hedonistic foreplay. By midday throngs already amass in the painted streets and shaded byways of the far out little village of Nimbin. Saturday’s brilliantine noonday heat transforms the vibrant subtropical splendour of the verdant landscape into a viridian radiance of enervating humidity. The autumnal atmosphere verges back into the sweaty green steambath conditions common during the last few years’ runaway greenhouse summers.

Yet untrammeled vigour still imbues the eagerly expectant assembly of freaks, straights, tourists and wannabe contenders with unabated intensity as they mingle and jostle for the year’s best buds, heads, colas and other less combustible comestibles. A demi-multitude straggles into town along gravel tracks and bitumen arteries, undeterred by the heat of climate catastrophe or police state shenanigans.

The locals are thoroughly outnumbered. Garbage bins overflow along the crowd-filled footpaths as thousands of camera wielding, fast food chomping visitors from despoiled lands of drear normality throng and mix, deal and fix, see and be seen beneath banners of the rainbow tribes and the all-seeing eyes of robotic surveillance cams. Spectrum-spanning painted faces stud the baseball capped crowd in chaotic arcs of rainbow colours, a well laundered shimmering sea of shiny black-and-blue-clad suburbanites.

Why don’t you speak of what you’ve seen? The shaman muses as he rises from his seat to leave the Oasis. Is it just egotistic concerns over credibility – or a matter of not speaking of things which don’t want to be known?

Many of the visitors exist under a perennial stupor of paranoia in ‘normal’ workaday lives – fearing loss of station or job, marriage or children, afraid of peer or parental disapproval and all the other snares and grasping adhesions of the noxious social glue that holds the hive in which they’re enmeshed together – even, particularly, while walking and gawking down the main and almost only street of World Hippie Central. The alternative-minded but socially camouflaged throng doesn’t yet realise that they represent most of the world’s people – non-conformists at heart, who all live under the self-imposed harness of unnecessary fears, weighed down by the pointless guilt so keenly felt by true innocents deprived of normal human requirements, and made to feel inferior when they seek to satisfy their needs.

All yearn for release from the straightjacket asylum of a barely post-feudal civilisation run by lunatic control freaks.

The ages-old witch and shaman ride within us all, suppressed or oppressed or free as a bird and all of us are hankering after a flavour that leads to the taste of other dimensions, fresher views – zestier, more riveting impressions of the sumptuous reality through which we otherwise drift like limbo-bound wraiths and automatons.

Most Mardi Grass revelers couldn’t give a damn about hypocritical, unjust laws and certainly know they’re not damaged or damned, but blessed to be out and about in one of the brightest, freest times and places in all the vast murky realms of human history.

Everyone’s here to party and experience unseen sights and untried delights; hippies, yuppie ‘aspirationals’, dreadlocked Rastas and dreaded ferals, priests, politicians, students, TV crews and reporters and backpacking travellers from all round the globe, shopkeepers, soldiers, big and little old men and women, checkout chicks, lawyers, bureaucrats, proud parents carrying brightly bedecked newborn babes, emigrant Greek fishermen, Indian software writers and call centre voices, emo Goths – and anyone else not interested in being an active part of the subtly feudal friendly fascist police surveillance state of impersonal corporate Big Brother clones and militant industrialists – and all are seeking the selfsame source of the philosophers, stoned. A broad cross-section is represented, as they say, and just about everyone’s smiling.

Fleecy clouds begin coalescing in the wide open sky’s more distant margins, blowing apart in this late Interglacial Age’s inexorably rising winds. The Rainbow Region is multiply blessed with rich soil and Sun, sea breezes and rain, luxuriantly lush and deliriously green even at the end of a historic nationwide mother of all droughts, and for the first time the annual parade will be free of the double-edged benison of rain.

A good year for curing the mull, if you look on the bright side… Could be a good vintage… The shamanic prince’s thoughts flit hither and yon while he makes a sine wave beeline for the great Strangler Fig. The Tree of Life beckons, arching across the market ground’s outdoor stage as he strides through streams of fossicking punters hovering round myriad stalls and jewellery-strewn blankets. The future’s so bright we’ll have to wear shades…

He reaches the Chai Tent and gratefully slides into a mismatched litter of comfy cushions on the hempen expanse of canvas flooring. Each and every Mardi Grass, the space beneath the market site’s grand old fig is reserved for the Chai Tent, right beside the covered stage. The chai’s always good – if you wait for it to properly brew – gingery and purifying for the partied-out and jaded throng recovering from the pleasant excesses of Friday night.

After taking a breath Ram’yana rises to inspect a tasty array of homemade organic cakes while John ladles some brew into a varied menagerie of ceramic cups. Muzza and John are regular fixtures at most alternative events, their friendly bearded familiar faces ever beaming behind fluttering prayer flags and political messages. They help their latest batch of eager helpers mix chai, coffee, teas and munchies beneath the generously shady green canopies of tree and marquee.

These days only half the food vendors in the ‘alternative’ township pay any attention to actual human or environmental health, beyond ubiquitous legal requirements of sanitation, hygiene and the like. Most of what they sell to paying consumers is toxic crap, just like the stuff most human folk will eat before, during or after reading these words.

But in Nimbin the other half are still wonderfully fastidious and most local produce is fairly organic. It’s been decades since aerial spraying of Agent Orange was common in these parts – in a saleable form with a slightly different brand name, of course, sprayed directly into the waterways and everywhere else when the hippies first arrived; one more lasting legacy of war’s fine record of ongoing ‘technological advancement’.

In Vietnam the peasants had no idea what was happening to them, but in Oz and other ‘advanced’ nations they sprayed tetragenic toxic herbicides on their own cropland, water, animals and farming families and newcomer hippies alike. Still do. Even in the ‘developed world’, the peasants are too ignorant or naive to realise that poison is poison is poison, and that all the products of Big Pharma and Big Oil and Big Brother are noxious, toxic, persistent carcinogens and/or other agents of insidious slow death. Speed kills. So does strychnine, arsenic, Agent Orange, Roundup and irradiated food. So do preservatives, colourings, bleaches, flavours, microwave radiation and most of the other shit floating around in human bloodstreams in the early Third Millennium.

And people wonder why they feel stoned all the time, why so many promising lives end so quickly.

It’s worth remembering, even if it’s unbelievable to most – three quarters of everything you eat, drink, breathe, touch, paint on yourself or wear is toxic, carcinogenic and debilitating. In a world where you rely on others instead of nature, all the crap you buy is made for making money, not for your health. As any individual toxic compound combines with all the other stuff in a ‘modern’ human body in ever more chaotic synergy, it’s no surprise almost everyone in the modern world is walking wounded, half asleep, barely here – role-playing the parts of automata in an industrial nightmare instead of being here now. Not to mention living ridiculously short, painful lives, in constant fear of the puzzling rebellion of the unknown, unstudied territories of their own bodies and minds.

The only way out is in, to create an inner place of peace unaffected by the turmoil, the inner sanctuary from which all imagination and creativity and immunity spring – and OUT, moving far away from the worst crap, stuff and nonsense of feudal capitalism, to at least attempt a different life in the last remnants of a healthier world. To bring every ‘lost’ dream all the way back from the last seed-source heartlands that still survive, and grow new lives that keep those heartlands sacred and inviolate. To grow a healthy world with a whole glowing soul. That’s the dream that most pursue or seek or view complete on the busy streets of Nimbin.

Here in the Rainbow Region a generation of brave beings has largely succeeded in their attempt to change the world within their horizon. The Nimbin Mardi Grass is barely a tenth of a greater green iceberg lurking just out of sight of The Grey Man and his equally hideous hidebound mate, the all-consuming Shopping Bitch. Alternative notions have evolved into a hidden yet subtly influential nation nestled within the recovering rainforest canopy. Its denizens have no need to officially secede from the larger notional paradigm of Oz – nothing secedes like success.

The Prince of Centraxis allows a multitude of voices wash over him through the amplified reggae horn section while Celtic harpists work the crowd from the psychedelic stage; “We all have the Buddha and the Troll within”, a bearded man in saffron is saying to a group of escaped students beneath the hemp tarpaulin. “Which do you prefer to give rein, and allow to reign through you?”

A high-pitched squeak obtrudes from a dozen paces distant; “Have you really looked at the shots of the twin towers exploding before they fall? Come on, it’s a crock of shit…”

“He’s selling ounces for a hundred but we have to be quick, it isn’t seedy…”

“Did you see those three girls doing it together at the doof?”

“Draw me a mud map and I can find it. Can we camp there, do y’reckon?”

“…working on a flow form whereby the superfine patterning embossed, as it were, on the metal substrate energises the water flowing across it…”

“What kind of metal?”

“…nuclear dump site for the rest of the world because that’s the only way we can have nuclear power plants and vice versa…”

“…but also draws slight but measurable and ultimately usable energy from the interaction…”

“…it’s all a little unclear if you ask me…”

“It’s all about money – we’ll make a motza from the storage fees – pay off the national debt…”

“You guys don’t remember, do you?”

“I’m going to hear that bloke from Canadia talk – you know, the one who got the medical exemption that says he can smoke?”

“I and eye don’ have t’worry, bud. Jah Rastafarii!”

“You mean it? How does that work?”

“You seen Narla? I lost ’er last night at the dance…”

“You mean your little girl?”

“Nah – her mum. Here – try some o’ this…”

“You know they had to let Rusty off all the charges?”

“Why? Because he was picked up by that flying saucer?”

“…the real question is, is scratching an itch or a willed act?”

“Huh?”

“O’ course it is! Yer just don’ notice the instant that it takes f’ yer to decide to do it.” It’s all too fast unless yer pay attention…”

A true story
By R. Ayana

Continues @ centraxis.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/prophetic-conspirators-… BE AWARE – THIS LINK LEADS TO IMPLICATE & XPLICIT CONCEPTS & IMAGES!

faerie magic 2012
legal bud black magic
Image by mardi grass 2011
Prophetic Conspirators: Psychedelic Water 27>

The mess accumulates and energy swells as adventurous travelers strut toward the promise of a truly psychedelic experience – an indelible climax to the weekend’s hedonistic foreplay. By midday throngs already amass in the painted streets and shaded byways of the far out little village of Nimbin. Saturday’s brilliantine noonday heat transforms the vibrant subtropical splendour of the verdant landscape into a viridian radiance of enervating humidity. The autumnal atmosphere verges back into the sweaty green steambath conditions common during the last few years’ runaway greenhouse summers.

Yet untrammeled vigour still imbues the eagerly expectant assembly of freaks, straights, tourists and wannabe contenders with unabated intensity as they mingle and jostle for the year’s best buds, heads, colas and other less combustible comestibles. A demi-multitude straggles into town along gravel tracks and bitumen arteries, undeterred by the heat of climate catastrophe or police state shenanigans.

The locals are thoroughly outnumbered. Garbage bins overflow along the crowd-filled footpaths as thousands of camera wielding, fast food chomping visitors from despoiled lands of drear normality throng and mix, deal and fix, see and be seen beneath banners of the rainbow tribes and the all-seeing eyes of robotic surveillance cams. Spectrum-spanning painted faces stud the baseball capped crowd in chaotic arcs of rainbow colours, a well laundered shimmering sea of shiny black-and-blue-clad suburbanites.

Why don’t you speak of what you’ve seen? The shaman muses as he rises from his seat to leave the Oasis. Is it just egotistic concerns over credibility – or a matter of not speaking of things which don’t want to be known?

Many of the visitors exist under a perennial stupor of paranoia in ‘normal’ workaday lives – fearing loss of station or job, marriage or children, afraid of peer or parental disapproval and all the other snares and grasping adhesions of the noxious social glue that holds the hive in which they’re enmeshed together – even, particularly, while walking and gawking down the main and almost only street of World Hippie Central. The alternative-minded but socially camouflaged throng doesn’t yet realise that they represent most of the world’s people – non-conformists at heart, who all live under the self-imposed harness of unnecessary fears, weighed down by the pointless guilt so keenly felt by true innocents deprived of normal human requirements, and made to feel inferior when they seek to satisfy their needs.

All yearn for release from the straightjacket asylum of a barely post-feudal civilisation run by lunatic control freaks.

The ages-old witch and shaman ride within us all, suppressed or oppressed or free as a bird and all of us are hankering after a flavour that leads to the taste of other dimensions, fresher views – zestier, more riveting impressions of the sumptuous reality through which we otherwise drift like limbo-bound wraiths and automatons.

Most Mardi Grass revelers couldn’t give a damn about hypocritical, unjust laws and certainly know they’re not damaged or damned, but blessed to be out and about in one of the brightest, freest times and places in all the vast murky realms of human history.

Everyone’s here to party and experience unseen sights and untried delights; hippies, yuppie ‘aspirationals’, dreadlocked Rastas and dreaded ferals, priests, politicians, students, TV crews and reporters and backpacking travellers from all round the globe, shopkeepers, soldiers, big and little old men and women, checkout chicks, lawyers, bureaucrats, proud parents carrying brightly bedecked newborn babes, emigrant Greek fishermen, Indian software writers and call centre voices, emo Goths – and anyone else not interested in being an active part of the subtly feudal friendly fascist police surveillance state of impersonal corporate Big Brother clones and militant industrialists – and all are seeking the selfsame source of the philosophers, stoned. A broad cross-section is represented, as they say, and just about everyone’s smiling.

Fleecy clouds begin coalescing in the wide open sky’s more distant margins, blowing apart in this late Interglacial Age’s inexorably rising winds. The Rainbow Region is multiply blessed with rich soil and Sun, sea breezes and rain, luxuriantly lush and deliriously green even at the end of a historic nationwide mother of all droughts, and for the first time the annual parade will be free of the double-edged benison of rain.

A good year for curing the mull, if you look on the bright side… Could be a good vintage… The shamanic prince’s thoughts flit hither and yon while he makes a sine wave beeline for the great Strangler Fig. The Tree of Life beckons, arching across the market ground’s outdoor stage as he strides through streams of fossicking punters hovering round myriad stalls and jewellery-strewn blankets. The future’s so bright we’ll have to wear shades…

He reaches the Chai Tent and gratefully slides into a mismatched litter of comfy cushions on the hempen expanse of canvas flooring. Each and every Mardi Grass, the space beneath the market site’s grand old fig is reserved for the Chai Tent, right beside the covered stage. The chai’s always good – if you wait for it to properly brew – gingery and purifying for the partied-out and jaded throng recovering from the pleasant excesses of Friday night.

After taking a breath Ram’yana rises to inspect a tasty array of homemade organic cakes while John ladles some brew into a varied menagerie of ceramic cups. Muzza and John are regular fixtures at most alternative events, their friendly bearded familiar faces ever beaming behind fluttering prayer flags and political messages. They help their latest batch of eager helpers mix chai, coffee, teas and munchies beneath the generously shady green canopies of tree and marquee.

These days only half the food vendors in the ‘alternative’ township pay any attention to actual human or environmental health, beyond ubiquitous legal requirements of sanitation, hygiene and the like. Most of what they sell to paying consumers is toxic crap, just like the stuff most human folk will eat before, during or after reading these words.

But in Nimbin the other half are still wonderfully fastidious and most local produce is fairly organic. It’s been decades since aerial spraying of Agent Orange was common in these parts – in a saleable form with a slightly different brand name, of course, sprayed directly into the waterways and everywhere else when the hippies first arrived; one more lasting legacy of war’s fine record of ongoing ‘technological advancement’.

In Vietnam the peasants had no idea what was happening to them, but in Oz and other ‘advanced’ nations they sprayed tetragenic toxic herbicides on their own cropland, water, animals and farming families and newcomer hippies alike. Still do. Even in the ‘developed world’, the peasants are too ignorant or naive to realise that poison is poison is poison, and that all the products of Big Pharma and Big Oil and Big Brother are noxious, toxic, persistent carcinogens and/or other agents of insidious slow death. Speed kills. So does strychnine, arsenic, Agent Orange, Roundup and irradiated food. So do preservatives, colourings, bleaches, flavours, microwave radiation and most of the other shit floating around in human bloodstreams in the early Third Millennium.

And people wonder why they feel stoned all the time, why so many promising lives end so quickly.

It’s worth remembering, even if it’s unbelievable to most – three quarters of everything you eat, drink, breathe, touch, paint on yourself or wear is toxic, carcinogenic and debilitating. In a world where you rely on others instead of nature, all the crap you buy is made for making money, not for your health. As any individual toxic compound combines with all the other stuff in a ‘modern’ human body in ever more chaotic synergy, it’s no surprise almost everyone in the modern world is walking wounded, half asleep, barely here – role-playing the parts of automata in an industrial nightmare instead of being here now. Not to mention living ridiculously short, painful lives, in constant fear of the puzzling rebellion of the unknown, unstudied territories of their own bodies and minds.

The only way out is in, to create an inner place of peace unaffected by the turmoil, the inner sanctuary from which all imagination and creativity and immunity spring – and OUT, moving far away from the worst crap, stuff and nonsense of feudal capitalism, to at least attempt a different life in the last remnants of a healthier world. To bring every ‘lost’ dream all the way back from the last seed-source heartlands that still survive, and grow new lives that keep those heartlands sacred and inviolate. To grow a healthy world with a whole glowing soul. That’s the dream that most pursue or seek or view complete on the busy streets of Nimbin.

Here in the Rainbow Region a generation of brave beings has largely succeeded in their attempt to change the world within their horizon. The Nimbin Mardi Grass is barely a tenth of a greater green iceberg lurking just out of sight of The Grey Man and his equally hideous hidebound mate, the all-consuming Shopping Bitch. Alternative notions have evolved into a hidden yet subtly influential nation nestled within the recovering rainforest canopy. Its denizens have no need to officially secede from the larger notional paradigm of Oz – nothing secedes like success.

The Prince of Centraxis allows a multitude of voices wash over him through the amplified reggae horn section while Celtic harpists work the crowd from the psychedelic stage; “We all have the Buddha and the Troll within”, a bearded man in saffron is saying to a group of escaped students beneath the hemp tarpaulin. “Which do you prefer to give rein, and allow to reign through you?”

A high-pitched squeak obtrudes from a dozen paces distant; “Have you really looked at the shots of the twin towers exploding before they fall? Come on, it’s a crock of shit…”

“He’s selling ounces for a hundred but we have to be quick, it isn’t seedy…”

“Did you see those three girls doing it together at the doof?”

“Draw me a mud map and I can find it. Can we camp there, do y’reckon?”

“…working on a flow form whereby the superfine patterning embossed, as it were, on the metal substrate energises the water flowing across it…”

“What kind of metal?”

“…nuclear dump site for the rest of the world because that’s the only way we can have nuclear power plants and vice versa…”

“…but also draws slight but measurable and ultimately usable energy from the interaction…”

“…it’s all a little unclear if you ask me…”

“It’s all about money – we’ll make a motza from the storage fees – pay off the national debt…”

“You guys don’t remember, do you?”

“I’m going to hear that bloke from Canadia talk – you know, the one who got the medical exemption that says he can smoke?”

“I and eye don’ have t’worry, bud. Jah Rastafarii!”

“You mean it? How does that work?”

“You seen Narla? I lost ’er last night at the dance…”

“You mean your little girl?”

“Nah – her mum. Here – try some o’ this…”

“You know they had to let Rusty off all the charges?”

“Why? Because he was picked up by that flying saucer?”

“…the real question is, is scratching an itch or a willed act?”

“Huh?”

“O’ course it is! Yer just don’ notice the instant that it takes f’ yer to decide to do it.” It’s all too fast unless yer pay attention…”

A true story
By R. Ayana

Continues @ centraxis.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/prophetic-conspirators-… BE AWARE – THIS LINK LEADS TO IMPLICATE & XPLICIT CONCEPTS & IMAGES!

Nice Free Legal Bud Blends photos

Some cool free legal bud blends images:

Buds and flowers of mango, Manifera indica …Phát hoa của cây Xoài ….
free legal bud blends
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Xoài .
Common names : Mango
Scientist name : Mangifera indica L.
Synonyms :
Family : Annacardiaceae . Họ Đào Lộn Hột

Links :

**** caythuoc.chothuoc24h.com/cay-thuoc/X/780/
Xoài – Mangifera indica L., thuộc họ Ðào lộn hột – Anacardiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây gỗ lớn, cao 10-20m, có tán rậm. Lá đơn, nguyên, mọc so le, phiến lá hình thuôn mũi mác, nhẵn, thơm. Hoa họp thành chùm kép ở ngọn cành. Hoa nhỏ, màu vàng, có 5 lá đài nhỏ, có lông ở mặt ngoài, 5 cánh hoa có tuyến mật, 5 nhị nhưng chỉ có 1-2 nhị sinh sản. Bầu trên, thường chỉ có một lá noãn chứa 1 noãn. Quả hạch chín màu vàng, thịt vàng, ngọt, thơm, nhân có xơ. Hạt rất to.

Bộ phận dùng: Quả, hạch của quả, lá, vỏ thân – Fructus, Nux, Folium et Cortex Mangiferae Indicae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Gốc ở Ấn Độ, được trồng nhiều ở các xứ nhiệt đới. Ở nước ta, Xoài được trồng ở nhiều nơi. Có nhiều thứ khác nhau như Xoài tượng, Xoài cát, Xoài cơm, Xoài thanh ca, v.v.. có thể thu hái các bộ phận của cây quanh năm, dùng tươi hay phơi khô.

Thành phần hóa học: Quả chứa nhiều caroten và vitamin B1, B2 và C. Hạch quả chứa nhiều tinh bột, dầu và tanin. Lá chứa tanin và một hợp nhất flavonoid là mangiferin. Vỏ thân chứa 3% tanin và mangiferin.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Quả, vỏ, lá có vị chua, ngọt, tính mát; hạch quả có vị chua, chát, tính bình. Quả có tác dụng thanh nhiệt tiêu trệ, ích vị, chỉ thổ, giải khát, lợi niệu. Hạt quả có tác dụng chỉ khái, kiện vị. Lá có tác dụng chỉ dương, hành khí sơ trệ, khu sa tích, lợi tiểu và có thể kháng nham. Vỏ thân có tác dụng thu liễm, sát trùng. Nhựa từ vỏ cây rỉ ra không mùi, có ví chát, đắng, hơi cay cũng có tác dụng như vỏ.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Quả Xoài và hạch quả dùng trị ho, tiêu hóa không bình thường, sán khí. Thịt quả dùng trị bệnh hoại huyết và loạn óc. Hạch quả còn dùng trị giun, kiết lỵ và ỉa chảy. Vỏ quả dùng trị kiết lỵ.

Lá dùng trị các bệnh phần trên đường hô hấp như ho, viêm phế quản mạn tính hay cấp tính, thủy thũng và dùng ngoài trị viêm da, ngứa ngáy ngoài da.

Vỏ thân thường được dùng trị ho, đau sưng họng và đau răng. Nhựa từ vỏ dùng trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy và bệnh ngoài da, cũng dùng trị bạch đới, kinh nguyệt quá nhiều.

Cách dùng: Ta thường trồng Xoài để lấy quả ăn. Vỏ thân dùng chữa đau răng. Lấy 1 miếng vỏ bằng bàn tay, cạo vỏ ngoài rồi thái mỏng. Nếu dùng vỏ tươi thì giã nhỏ, vắt lấy nước, thêm tí muối để ngậm rồi nhổ nước, mỗi ngày 4-5 lần. Nếu dùng vỏ khô thì sắc lấy nước: đổ 2 bát nước đun sôi, giữ nước sôi kỹ trong nửa giờ, gạn lấy nước sắc, thêm vài hạt muối rồi ngậm. Mỗi lần ngậm chừng một chén con. Ngậm trong 10 phút, thỉnh thoảng súc sang hai bên má rồi nhổ đi. Ngậm 3-4 lần trong ngày, liên tiếp vài ba ngày.

Nhựa cây tươi đem ngâm trong nước Chanh dùng trị các thứ ghẻ lở. Hạt phơi khô, tán bột, dùng mỗi lần 1,5g trị giun hoặc uống trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy. Lá thường dùng nấu nước xông trị các bệnh trong họng.

**** www.khoahocchonhanong.com.vn/CSDLKHCN/modules.php?name=Ne…
**** www.khuyennongtphcm.com/index.php?mnu=4&s=600012&…
**** www.dongthap.gov.vn/wps/portal/huyencaolanh/!ut/p/c0/04_S…

______________________________________________________________

**** en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mango
The mango is a fleshy stone fruit belonging to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. While other Mangifera species (e.g. horse mango, M. foetida) are also grown on a more localized basis, Mangifera indica – the common mango or Indian mango – is the only mango tree commonly cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions, and its fruit is distributed essentially worldwide.
In several cultures, its fruit and leaves are ritually used as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies[citation needed].
Mangos were first cultivated in Southeast Asia

Etymology

The word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa; pronounced "manga"). The word’s first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as Manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text. The origin of the -o ending in English is unclear.[2]
When mangoes were first imported to the American colonies in the 17th century, they had to be pickled due to lack of refrigeration. Other fruits were also pickled and came to be called "mangoes" (especially bell peppers), and by the 18th century, the word "mango" became a verb meaning "to pickle"

Description
Mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) grow up to 35–40 m (115–130 ft) tall, with a crown radius of 10 m (33 ft). The mango tree is long-lived, as some specimens still fruit after 300 years.[citation needed] In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 6 m (20 ft) with profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots; the tree also sends down many anchor roots, which penetrate several feet of soil. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, 15–35 cm (5.9–14 in) long and 6–16 cm (2.4–6.3 in) broad; when the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark glossy red, then dark green as they mature. The flowers are produced in terminal panicles 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long; each flower is small and white with five petals 5–10 mm (0.20–0.39 in) long, with a mild sweet odor suggestive of lily of the valley. The fruit takes three to six months to ripen.

The seed of mango can be hairy or fibrous

The "hedgehog" style is a common way of eating mangoes (left). A cross section of a mango can be seen on the right, not quite fully halving the fruit as the stone is not visible
The ripe fruit varies in size and color. Cultivars are variously yellow, orange, red or green, and carry a single flat, oblong pit that can be fibrous or hairy on the surface, and which does not separate easily from the pulp. Ripe, unpeeled fruit gives off a distinctive resinous, sweet smell. Inside the pit 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) thick is a thin lining covering a single seed, 4–7 mm (0.16–0.28 in) long. The seed contains the plant embryo.

Cultivation

Mango orchard in Multan, Pakistan

Unripe mangoes on a mango tree
Mangoes have been cultivated in South Asia for thousands of years[4] and reached East Asia between the 5th and 4th centuries BC. By the 10th century AD, cultivation had begun in East Africa.[4] The 14th century Moroccan traveler, Ibn Battuta, reported it at Mogadishu.[5] Cultivation came later to Brazil, the West Indies and Mexico, where an appropriate climate allows its growth.[4]
Mango is now cultivated in most frost-free tropical and warmer subtropical climates; More than a third of the world’s mangoes are cultivated in India alone second being China[citation needed].[6][7][8]
Mango is also being grown in Andalusia, Spain (mainly in Málaga province), which is one of the few places in mainland Europe that allows growth of tropical plants and fruit trees.[9] Many of the 1,000+ mango cultivars are easily cultivated using grafted saplings, ranging from the "turpentine mango" (named for its strong taste of turpentine[10]) to the huevos de toro.[citation needed]
Other cultivators include North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, south, west and central Africa, Australia, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Southeast Asia.
Though India is the largest producer of mangoes (Pakistan being the largest exporter[citation needed]), it accounts for less than one percent[citation needed] of the international mango trade, consuming most of its own output.[11]
Dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties serve as ornamental plants and can be grown in containers.
A wide variety of diseases can afflict mangoes; see List of mango diseases.

Potential for contact dermatitis
Mango peel and sap contains urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy and poison sumac that can cause urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in susceptible people.[12] Cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol have been observed.[13] Those with a history of poison ivy or poison oak contact dermatitis may be most at risk for such an allergic reaction.[14] Urushiol is also present in mango leaves and stems. During mango’s primary ripening season, it is the most common source of plant dermatitis in Hawaii.

Food

An unripe mango of Ratnagiri (India)
The mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while the flesh of others is firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, or may have a fibrous texture. For consumption of unripe, pickled or cooked fruit, the mango skin may be consumed comfortably, but has potential to cause contact dermatitis (above) of the lips, gingiva or tongue in susceptible people. In ripe fruits which are commonly eaten fresh, the skin may be thicker and bitter tasting, so is typically not eaten.

Cuisine

Commercially packaged mango powder sold in clear plastic wrapping
Mangoes are widely used in cuisine. Sour, unripe mangoes are used in chutneys, athanu, pickles, or side dishes, or may be eaten raw with salt, chili, or soy sauce. A cooling summer drink called panna or panha comes from mangoes.
Ripe mangoes are typically eaten fresh; however, they can have many other culinary uses. Mango Lassi, a popular drink made throughout South Asia[citation needed], is created by mixing ripe mangoes or mango pulp with yogurt and sugar. Ripe mangoes are also used to make curries. Aamras is a popular pulp/thick juice made of mangoes with sugar or milk, and is consumed with bread, rice or pooris. The pulp from ripe mangoes is also used to make jam called ‘mangada’.
Mangoes are used in preserves like moramba, amchur (dried and powdered unripe mango) and pickles, including a spicy mustard-oil pickle. Ripe mangoes are often cut into thin layers, desiccated, folded, and then cut. These bars are similar to dried guava fruit bars available in some countries. The fruit is also added to cereal products like muesli and oat granola.

Native green mangoes from the Philippines

A basket of ripe mangoes from Bangladesh
Unripe mango may be eaten with bagoong (especially in the Philippines), fish sauce or with dash of salt. Dried strips of sweet, ripe mango (sometimes combined with seedless tamarind to form mangorind) are also popular. Mangoes may be used to make juices, mango nectar, and as a flavoring and major ingredient in ice cream and sorbetes.
Mango is used to make juices, smoothies, ice cream, fruit bars, raspados, aguas frescas, pies and sweet chili sauce, or mixed with chamoy, a sweet and spicy chili paste. It is popular on a stick dipped in hot chili powder and salt or also as a main ingredient in fresh fruit combinations. In Central America, mango is either eaten green mixed with salt, vinegar, black pepper and hot sauce, or ripe in various forms. Toasted and ground pumpkin seed (called pepita) with lime and salt are the norm when eating green mangoes. Some people also add soy sauce or chili sauce.
Pieces of mango can be mashed and used as a topping on ice cream or blended with milk and ice as milkshakes. Sweet glutinous rice is flavored with coconut, then served with sliced mango as a dessert. In other parts of Southeast Asia, mangoes are pickled with fish sauce and rice vinegar. Green mangoes can be used in mango salad with fish sauce and dried shrimp. Mango with condensed milk may be used as a topping for shaved ice.

Nutrients and phytochemicals
Mango, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy272 kJ (65 kcal)
Carbohydrates17.00 g
– Sugars14.8 g
– Dietary fiber1.8 g
Fat0.27 g
Protein0.51 g
Vitamin A equiv.38 μg (4%)
– beta-carotene445 μg (4%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1)0.058 mg (4%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)0.057 mg (4%)
Niacin (Vit. B3)0.584 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5)0.160 mg (3%)
Vitamin B60.134 mg (10%)
Folate (Vit. B9)14 μg (4%)
Vitamin C27.7 mg (46%)
Calcium10 mg (1%)
Iron0.13 mg (1%)
Magnesium9 mg (2%)
Phosphorus11 mg (2%)
Potassium156 mg (3%)
Zinc0.04 mg (0%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) is 272 kJ (65 kcal) and that of the apple mango is slightly higher (79 kcal per 100g). Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals[16] and nutrients. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin C, diverse polyphenols and provitamin A carotenoids.[17]
Mango contains essential vitamins and dietary minerals. The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E compose 25%, 76% and 9% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) in a 165-gram (5.8-oz) serving. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, 11% DRI), vitamin K (9% DRI), other B vitamins and essential nutrients, such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids are at good levels. Mango peel and pulp contain other phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants – carotenoids and polyphenols – and omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.[citation needed]
Mango peel contains pigments that may have antioxidant properties,[16][18] including carotenoids, such as the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene,[19] polyphenols[20][21] such as quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechins, tannins, and the unique mango xanthonoid, mangiferin,[22] any of which may counteract free radicals in various disease processes as revealed in preliminary research.[23][24] Phytochemical and nutrient content appears to vary across mango species.[25] Up to 25 different carotenoids have been isolated from mango pulp, the densest of which was beta-carotene, which accounts for the yellow-orange pigmentation of most mango species.[26] Peel and leaves also have significant polyphenol content, including xanthonoids, mangiferin and gallic acid.[27]
The mango triterpene, lupeol,[28] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[29][30][31] An extract of mango branch bark called Vimang, isolated by Cuban scientists, contains numerous polyphenols with antioxidant properties in vitro[32] and on blood parameters of elderly humans.[33]
The pigment euxanthin, known as Indian yellow, is often thought to be produced from the urine of cattle fed mango leaves; the practice is described as having been outlawed in 1908 due to malnutrition of the cows and possible urushiol poisoning.[34] This supposed origin of euxanthin appears to rely on a single, anecdotal source, and Indian legal records do not outlaw such a practice.

Cultural significance

Mango roundabout, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
The mango is the national fruit of India,[36] Pakistan, and the Philippines.[37] The mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.[38]
In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of the goddess Saraswati.
Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi. Mango motifs and paisleys are widely used in different Indian embroidery styles, and are found in Kashmiri shawls, Kanchipuram silk sarees, etc. Paisleys are also common to Iranian art, because of its pre-Islamic Zoroastrian past.
In Tamilnadu, Mango is considered, along with Banana and jack fruit, as the Three royal fruits (Mukkani)
Famous Urdu poet Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib was very fond of mangoes. There are many anecdotes concerning his love for mangoes.

In Australia, where mangoes are considered to be a symbol of summer, the first tray of mangoes of the season is traditionally sold at an auction for charity

………………………………………………………………….. Click on link to read more, please

Bud and flower ‘s close up ( Mangifera indica ) ….Chụp gần hoa và nụ của cây Xoài….
free legal bud blends
Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Xoài .
Common names : Mango
Scientist name : Mangifera indica L.
Synonyms :
Family : Annacardiaceae . Họ Đào Lộn Hột

Links :

**** caythuoc.chothuoc24h.com/cay-thuoc/X/780/
Xoài – Mangifera indica L., thuộc họ Ðào lộn hột – Anacardiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây gỗ lớn, cao 10-20m, có tán rậm. Lá đơn, nguyên, mọc so le, phiến lá hình thuôn mũi mác, nhẵn, thơm. Hoa họp thành chùm kép ở ngọn cành. Hoa nhỏ, màu vàng, có 5 lá đài nhỏ, có lông ở mặt ngoài, 5 cánh hoa có tuyến mật, 5 nhị nhưng chỉ có 1-2 nhị sinh sản. Bầu trên, thường chỉ có một lá noãn chứa 1 noãn. Quả hạch chín màu vàng, thịt vàng, ngọt, thơm, nhân có xơ. Hạt rất to.

Bộ phận dùng: Quả, hạch của quả, lá, vỏ thân – Fructus, Nux, Folium et Cortex Mangiferae Indicae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Gốc ở Ấn Độ, được trồng nhiều ở các xứ nhiệt đới. Ở nước ta, Xoài được trồng ở nhiều nơi. Có nhiều thứ khác nhau như Xoài tượng, Xoài cát, Xoài cơm, Xoài thanh ca, v.v.. có thể thu hái các bộ phận của cây quanh năm, dùng tươi hay phơi khô.

Thành phần hóa học: Quả chứa nhiều caroten và vitamin B1, B2 và C. Hạch quả chứa nhiều tinh bột, dầu và tanin. Lá chứa tanin và một hợp nhất flavonoid là mangiferin. Vỏ thân chứa 3% tanin và mangiferin.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Quả, vỏ, lá có vị chua, ngọt, tính mát; hạch quả có vị chua, chát, tính bình. Quả có tác dụng thanh nhiệt tiêu trệ, ích vị, chỉ thổ, giải khát, lợi niệu. Hạt quả có tác dụng chỉ khái, kiện vị. Lá có tác dụng chỉ dương, hành khí sơ trệ, khu sa tích, lợi tiểu và có thể kháng nham. Vỏ thân có tác dụng thu liễm, sát trùng. Nhựa từ vỏ cây rỉ ra không mùi, có ví chát, đắng, hơi cay cũng có tác dụng như vỏ.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Quả Xoài và hạch quả dùng trị ho, tiêu hóa không bình thường, sán khí. Thịt quả dùng trị bệnh hoại huyết và loạn óc. Hạch quả còn dùng trị giun, kiết lỵ và ỉa chảy. Vỏ quả dùng trị kiết lỵ.

Lá dùng trị các bệnh phần trên đường hô hấp như ho, viêm phế quản mạn tính hay cấp tính, thủy thũng và dùng ngoài trị viêm da, ngứa ngáy ngoài da.

Vỏ thân thường được dùng trị ho, đau sưng họng và đau răng. Nhựa từ vỏ dùng trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy và bệnh ngoài da, cũng dùng trị bạch đới, kinh nguyệt quá nhiều.

Cách dùng: Ta thường trồng Xoài để lấy quả ăn. Vỏ thân dùng chữa đau răng. Lấy 1 miếng vỏ bằng bàn tay, cạo vỏ ngoài rồi thái mỏng. Nếu dùng vỏ tươi thì giã nhỏ, vắt lấy nước, thêm tí muối để ngậm rồi nhổ nước, mỗi ngày 4-5 lần. Nếu dùng vỏ khô thì sắc lấy nước: đổ 2 bát nước đun sôi, giữ nước sôi kỹ trong nửa giờ, gạn lấy nước sắc, thêm vài hạt muối rồi ngậm. Mỗi lần ngậm chừng một chén con. Ngậm trong 10 phút, thỉnh thoảng súc sang hai bên má rồi nhổ đi. Ngậm 3-4 lần trong ngày, liên tiếp vài ba ngày.

Nhựa cây tươi đem ngâm trong nước Chanh dùng trị các thứ ghẻ lở. Hạt phơi khô, tán bột, dùng mỗi lần 1,5g trị giun hoặc uống trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy. Lá thường dùng nấu nước xông trị các bệnh trong họng.

**** www.khoahocchonhanong.com.vn/CSDLKHCN/modules.php?name=Ne…
**** www.khuyennongtphcm.com/index.php?mnu=4&s=600012&…
**** www.dongthap.gov.vn/wps/portal/huyencaolanh/!ut/p/c0/04_S…

______________________________________________________________

**** en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mango
The mango is a fleshy stone fruit belonging to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. While other Mangifera species (e.g. horse mango, M. foetida) are also grown on a more localized basis, Mangifera indica – the common mango or Indian mango – is the only mango tree commonly cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions, and its fruit is distributed essentially worldwide.
In several cultures, its fruit and leaves are ritually used as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies[citation needed].
Mangos were first cultivated in Southeast Asia

Etymology

The word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa; pronounced "manga"). The word’s first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as Manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text. The origin of the -o ending in English is unclear.[2]
When mangoes were first imported to the American colonies in the 17th century, they had to be pickled due to lack of refrigeration. Other fruits were also pickled and came to be called "mangoes" (especially bell peppers), and by the 18th century, the word "mango" became a verb meaning "to pickle"

Description
Mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) grow up to 35–40 m (115–130 ft) tall, with a crown radius of 10 m (33 ft). The mango tree is long-lived, as some specimens still fruit after 300 years.[citation needed] In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 6 m (20 ft) with profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots; the tree also sends down many anchor roots, which penetrate several feet of soil. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, 15–35 cm (5.9–14 in) long and 6–16 cm (2.4–6.3 in) broad; when the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark glossy red, then dark green as they mature. The flowers are produced in terminal panicles 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long; each flower is small and white with five petals 5–10 mm (0.20–0.39 in) long, with a mild sweet odor suggestive of lily of the valley. The fruit takes three to six months to ripen.

The seed of mango can be hairy or fibrous

The "hedgehog" style is a common way of eating mangoes (left). A cross section of a mango can be seen on the right, not quite fully halving the fruit as the stone is not visible
The ripe fruit varies in size and color. Cultivars are variously yellow, orange, red or green, and carry a single flat, oblong pit that can be fibrous or hairy on the surface, and which does not separate easily from the pulp. Ripe, unpeeled fruit gives off a distinctive resinous, sweet smell. Inside the pit 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) thick is a thin lining covering a single seed, 4–7 mm (0.16–0.28 in) long. The seed contains the plant embryo.

Cultivation

Mango orchard in Multan, Pakistan

Unripe mangoes on a mango tree
Mangoes have been cultivated in South Asia for thousands of years[4] and reached East Asia between the 5th and 4th centuries BC. By the 10th century AD, cultivation had begun in East Africa.[4] The 14th century Moroccan traveler, Ibn Battuta, reported it at Mogadishu.[5] Cultivation came later to Brazil, the West Indies and Mexico, where an appropriate climate allows its growth.[4]
Mango is now cultivated in most frost-free tropical and warmer subtropical climates; More than a third of the world’s mangoes are cultivated in India alone second being China[citation needed].[6][7][8]
Mango is also being grown in Andalusia, Spain (mainly in Málaga province), which is one of the few places in mainland Europe that allows growth of tropical plants and fruit trees.[9] Many of the 1,000+ mango cultivars are easily cultivated using grafted saplings, ranging from the "turpentine mango" (named for its strong taste of turpentine[10]) to the huevos de toro.[citation needed]
Other cultivators include North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, south, west and central Africa, Australia, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Southeast Asia.
Though India is the largest producer of mangoes (Pakistan being the largest exporter[citation needed]), it accounts for less than one percent[citation needed] of the international mango trade, consuming most of its own output.[11]
Dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties serve as ornamental plants and can be grown in containers.
A wide variety of diseases can afflict mangoes; see List of mango diseases.

Potential for contact dermatitis
Mango peel and sap contains urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy and poison sumac that can cause urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in susceptible people.[12] Cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol have been observed.[13] Those with a history of poison ivy or poison oak contact dermatitis may be most at risk for such an allergic reaction.[14] Urushiol is also present in mango leaves and stems. During mango’s primary ripening season, it is the most common source of plant dermatitis in Hawaii.

Food

An unripe mango of Ratnagiri (India)
The mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while the flesh of others is firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, or may have a fibrous texture. For consumption of unripe, pickled or cooked fruit, the mango skin may be consumed comfortably, but has potential to cause contact dermatitis (above) of the lips, gingiva or tongue in susceptible people. In ripe fruits which are commonly eaten fresh, the skin may be thicker and bitter tasting, so is typically not eaten.

Cuisine

Commercially packaged mango powder sold in clear plastic wrapping
Mangoes are widely used in cuisine. Sour, unripe mangoes are used in chutneys, athanu, pickles, or side dishes, or may be eaten raw with salt, chili, or soy sauce. A cooling summer drink called panna or panha comes from mangoes.
Ripe mangoes are typically eaten fresh; however, they can have many other culinary uses. Mango Lassi, a popular drink made throughout South Asia[citation needed], is created by mixing ripe mangoes or mango pulp with yogurt and sugar. Ripe mangoes are also used to make curries. Aamras is a popular pulp/thick juice made of mangoes with sugar or milk, and is consumed with bread, rice or pooris. The pulp from ripe mangoes is also used to make jam called ‘mangada’.
Mangoes are used in preserves like moramba, amchur (dried and powdered unripe mango) and pickles, including a spicy mustard-oil pickle. Ripe mangoes are often cut into thin layers, desiccated, folded, and then cut. These bars are similar to dried guava fruit bars available in some countries. The fruit is also added to cereal products like muesli and oat granola.

Native green mangoes from the Philippines

A basket of ripe mangoes from Bangladesh
Unripe mango may be eaten with bagoong (especially in the Philippines), fish sauce or with dash of salt. Dried strips of sweet, ripe mango (sometimes combined with seedless tamarind to form mangorind) are also popular. Mangoes may be used to make juices, mango nectar, and as a flavoring and major ingredient in ice cream and sorbetes.
Mango is used to make juices, smoothies, ice cream, fruit bars, raspados, aguas frescas, pies and sweet chili sauce, or mixed with chamoy, a sweet and spicy chili paste. It is popular on a stick dipped in hot chili powder and salt or also as a main ingredient in fresh fruit combinations. In Central America, mango is either eaten green mixed with salt, vinegar, black pepper and hot sauce, or ripe in various forms. Toasted and ground pumpkin seed (called pepita) with lime and salt are the norm when eating green mangoes. Some people also add soy sauce or chili sauce.
Pieces of mango can be mashed and used as a topping on ice cream or blended with milk and ice as milkshakes. Sweet glutinous rice is flavored with coconut, then served with sliced mango as a dessert. In other parts of Southeast Asia, mangoes are pickled with fish sauce and rice vinegar. Green mangoes can be used in mango salad with fish sauce and dried shrimp. Mango with condensed milk may be used as a topping for shaved ice.

Nutrients and phytochemicals
Mango, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy272 kJ (65 kcal)
Carbohydrates17.00 g
– Sugars14.8 g
– Dietary fiber1.8 g
Fat0.27 g
Protein0.51 g
Vitamin A equiv.38 μg (4%)
– beta-carotene445 μg (4%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1)0.058 mg (4%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)0.057 mg (4%)
Niacin (Vit. B3)0.584 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5)0.160 mg (3%)
Vitamin B60.134 mg (10%)
Folate (Vit. B9)14 μg (4%)
Vitamin C27.7 mg (46%)
Calcium10 mg (1%)
Iron0.13 mg (1%)
Magnesium9 mg (2%)
Phosphorus11 mg (2%)
Potassium156 mg (3%)
Zinc0.04 mg (0%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) is 272 kJ (65 kcal) and that of the apple mango is slightly higher (79 kcal per 100g). Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals[16] and nutrients. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin C, diverse polyphenols and provitamin A carotenoids.[17]
Mango contains essential vitamins and dietary minerals. The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E compose 25%, 76% and 9% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) in a 165-gram (5.8-oz) serving. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, 11% DRI), vitamin K (9% DRI), other B vitamins and essential nutrients, such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids are at good levels. Mango peel and pulp contain other phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants – carotenoids and polyphenols – and omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.[citation needed]
Mango peel contains pigments that may have antioxidant properties,[16][18] including carotenoids, such as the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene,[19] polyphenols[20][21] such as quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechins, tannins, and the unique mango xanthonoid, mangiferin,[22] any of which may counteract free radicals in various disease processes as revealed in preliminary research.[23][24] Phytochemical and nutrient content appears to vary across mango species.[25] Up to 25 different carotenoids have been isolated from mango pulp, the densest of which was beta-carotene, which accounts for the yellow-orange pigmentation of most mango species.[26] Peel and leaves also have significant polyphenol content, including xanthonoids, mangiferin and gallic acid.[27]
The mango triterpene, lupeol,[28] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[29][30][31] An extract of mango branch bark called Vimang, isolated by Cuban scientists, contains numerous polyphenols with antioxidant properties in vitro[32] and on blood parameters of elderly humans.[33]
The pigment euxanthin, known as Indian yellow, is often thought to be produced from the urine of cattle fed mango leaves; the practice is described as having been outlawed in 1908 due to malnutrition of the cows and possible urushiol poisoning.[34] This supposed origin of euxanthin appears to rely on a single, anecdotal source, and Indian legal records do not outlaw such a practice.

Cultural significance

Mango roundabout, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
The mango is the national fruit of India,[36] Pakistan, and the Philippines.[37] The mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.[38]
In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of the goddess Saraswati.
Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi. Mango motifs and paisleys are widely used in different Indian embroidery styles, and are found in Kashmiri shawls, Kanchipuram silk sarees, etc. Paisleys are also common to Iranian art, because of its pre-Islamic Zoroastrian past.
In Tamilnadu, Mango is considered, along with Banana and jack fruit, as the Three royal fruits (Mukkani)
Famous Urdu poet Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib was very fond of mangoes. There are many anecdotes concerning his love for mangoes.

In Australia, where mangoes are considered to be a symbol of summer, the first tray of mangoes of the season is traditionally sold at an auction for charity

………………………………………………………………….. Click on link to read more, please

Mango ‘s buds and flowers close up ….Chụp gần nụ và hoa của cây Xoài …
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Image by Vietnam Plants & America plants
Vietnamese named : Xoài .
Common names : Mango
Scientist name : Mangifera indica L.
Synonyms :
Family : Annacardiaceae . Họ Đào Lộn Hột

Links :

**** caythuoc.chothuoc24h.com/cay-thuoc/X/780/
Xoài – Mangifera indica L., thuộc họ Ðào lộn hột – Anacardiaceae.

Mô tả: Cây gỗ lớn, cao 10-20m, có tán rậm. Lá đơn, nguyên, mọc so le, phiến lá hình thuôn mũi mác, nhẵn, thơm. Hoa họp thành chùm kép ở ngọn cành. Hoa nhỏ, màu vàng, có 5 lá đài nhỏ, có lông ở mặt ngoài, 5 cánh hoa có tuyến mật, 5 nhị nhưng chỉ có 1-2 nhị sinh sản. Bầu trên, thường chỉ có một lá noãn chứa 1 noãn. Quả hạch chín màu vàng, thịt vàng, ngọt, thơm, nhân có xơ. Hạt rất to.

Bộ phận dùng: Quả, hạch của quả, lá, vỏ thân – Fructus, Nux, Folium et Cortex Mangiferae Indicae.

Nơi sống và thu hái: Gốc ở Ấn Độ, được trồng nhiều ở các xứ nhiệt đới. Ở nước ta, Xoài được trồng ở nhiều nơi. Có nhiều thứ khác nhau như Xoài tượng, Xoài cát, Xoài cơm, Xoài thanh ca, v.v.. có thể thu hái các bộ phận của cây quanh năm, dùng tươi hay phơi khô.

Thành phần hóa học: Quả chứa nhiều caroten và vitamin B1, B2 và C. Hạch quả chứa nhiều tinh bột, dầu và tanin. Lá chứa tanin và một hợp nhất flavonoid là mangiferin. Vỏ thân chứa 3% tanin và mangiferin.

Tính vị, tác dụng: Quả, vỏ, lá có vị chua, ngọt, tính mát; hạch quả có vị chua, chát, tính bình. Quả có tác dụng thanh nhiệt tiêu trệ, ích vị, chỉ thổ, giải khát, lợi niệu. Hạt quả có tác dụng chỉ khái, kiện vị. Lá có tác dụng chỉ dương, hành khí sơ trệ, khu sa tích, lợi tiểu và có thể kháng nham. Vỏ thân có tác dụng thu liễm, sát trùng. Nhựa từ vỏ cây rỉ ra không mùi, có ví chát, đắng, hơi cay cũng có tác dụng như vỏ.

Công dụng, chỉ định và phối hợp: Quả Xoài và hạch quả dùng trị ho, tiêu hóa không bình thường, sán khí. Thịt quả dùng trị bệnh hoại huyết và loạn óc. Hạch quả còn dùng trị giun, kiết lỵ và ỉa chảy. Vỏ quả dùng trị kiết lỵ.

Lá dùng trị các bệnh phần trên đường hô hấp như ho, viêm phế quản mạn tính hay cấp tính, thủy thũng và dùng ngoài trị viêm da, ngứa ngáy ngoài da.

Vỏ thân thường được dùng trị ho, đau sưng họng và đau răng. Nhựa từ vỏ dùng trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy và bệnh ngoài da, cũng dùng trị bạch đới, kinh nguyệt quá nhiều.

Cách dùng: Ta thường trồng Xoài để lấy quả ăn. Vỏ thân dùng chữa đau răng. Lấy 1 miếng vỏ bằng bàn tay, cạo vỏ ngoài rồi thái mỏng. Nếu dùng vỏ tươi thì giã nhỏ, vắt lấy nước, thêm tí muối để ngậm rồi nhổ nước, mỗi ngày 4-5 lần. Nếu dùng vỏ khô thì sắc lấy nước: đổ 2 bát nước đun sôi, giữ nước sôi kỹ trong nửa giờ, gạn lấy nước sắc, thêm vài hạt muối rồi ngậm. Mỗi lần ngậm chừng một chén con. Ngậm trong 10 phút, thỉnh thoảng súc sang hai bên má rồi nhổ đi. Ngậm 3-4 lần trong ngày, liên tiếp vài ba ngày.

Nhựa cây tươi đem ngâm trong nước Chanh dùng trị các thứ ghẻ lở. Hạt phơi khô, tán bột, dùng mỗi lần 1,5g trị giun hoặc uống trị kiết lỵ, ỉa chảy. Lá thường dùng nấu nước xông trị các bệnh trong họng.

**** www.khoahocchonhanong.com.vn/CSDLKHCN/modules.php?name=Ne…
**** www.khuyennongtphcm.com/index.php?mnu=4&s=600012&…
**** www.dongthap.gov.vn/wps/portal/huyencaolanh/!ut/p/c0/04_S…

______________________________________________________________

**** en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mango
The mango is a fleshy stone fruit belonging to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous tropical fruiting trees in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. While other Mangifera species (e.g. horse mango, M. foetida) are also grown on a more localized basis, Mangifera indica – the common mango or Indian mango – is the only mango tree commonly cultivated in many tropical and subtropical regions, and its fruit is distributed essentially worldwide.
In several cultures, its fruit and leaves are ritually used as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies[citation needed].
Mangos were first cultivated in Southeast Asia

Etymology

The word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa; pronounced "manga"). The word’s first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as Manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text. The origin of the -o ending in English is unclear.[2]
When mangoes were first imported to the American colonies in the 17th century, they had to be pickled due to lack of refrigeration. Other fruits were also pickled and came to be called "mangoes" (especially bell peppers), and by the 18th century, the word "mango" became a verb meaning "to pickle"

Description
Mango trees (Mangifera indica L.) grow up to 35–40 m (115–130 ft) tall, with a crown radius of 10 m (33 ft). The mango tree is long-lived, as some specimens still fruit after 300 years.[citation needed] In deep soil, the taproot descends to a depth of 6 m (20 ft) with profuse, wide-spreading feeder roots; the tree also sends down many anchor roots, which penetrate several feet of soil. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, 15–35 cm (5.9–14 in) long and 6–16 cm (2.4–6.3 in) broad; when the leaves are young they are orange-pink, rapidly changing to a dark glossy red, then dark green as they mature. The flowers are produced in terminal panicles 10–40 cm (3.9–16 in) long; each flower is small and white with five petals 5–10 mm (0.20–0.39 in) long, with a mild sweet odor suggestive of lily of the valley. The fruit takes three to six months to ripen.

The seed of mango can be hairy or fibrous

The "hedgehog" style is a common way of eating mangoes (left). A cross section of a mango can be seen on the right, not quite fully halving the fruit as the stone is not visible
The ripe fruit varies in size and color. Cultivars are variously yellow, orange, red or green, and carry a single flat, oblong pit that can be fibrous or hairy on the surface, and which does not separate easily from the pulp. Ripe, unpeeled fruit gives off a distinctive resinous, sweet smell. Inside the pit 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) thick is a thin lining covering a single seed, 4–7 mm (0.16–0.28 in) long. The seed contains the plant embryo.

Cultivation

Mango orchard in Multan, Pakistan

Unripe mangoes on a mango tree
Mangoes have been cultivated in South Asia for thousands of years[4] and reached East Asia between the 5th and 4th centuries BC. By the 10th century AD, cultivation had begun in East Africa.[4] The 14th century Moroccan traveler, Ibn Battuta, reported it at Mogadishu.[5] Cultivation came later to Brazil, the West Indies and Mexico, where an appropriate climate allows its growth.[4]
Mango is now cultivated in most frost-free tropical and warmer subtropical climates; More than a third of the world’s mangoes are cultivated in India alone second being China[citation needed].[6][7][8]
Mango is also being grown in Andalusia, Spain (mainly in Málaga province), which is one of the few places in mainland Europe that allows growth of tropical plants and fruit trees.[9] Many of the 1,000+ mango cultivars are easily cultivated using grafted saplings, ranging from the "turpentine mango" (named for its strong taste of turpentine[10]) to the huevos de toro.[citation needed]
Other cultivators include North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, south, west and central Africa, Australia, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Southeast Asia.
Though India is the largest producer of mangoes (Pakistan being the largest exporter[citation needed]), it accounts for less than one percent[citation needed] of the international mango trade, consuming most of its own output.[11]
Dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties serve as ornamental plants and can be grown in containers.
A wide variety of diseases can afflict mangoes; see List of mango diseases.

Potential for contact dermatitis
Mango peel and sap contains urushiol, the chemical in poison ivy and poison sumac that can cause urushiol-induced contact dermatitis in susceptible people.[12] Cross-reactions between mango contact allergens and urushiol have been observed.[13] Those with a history of poison ivy or poison oak contact dermatitis may be most at risk for such an allergic reaction.[14] Urushiol is also present in mango leaves and stems. During mango’s primary ripening season, it is the most common source of plant dermatitis in Hawaii.

Food

An unripe mango of Ratnagiri (India)
The mango is generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars, some having a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while the flesh of others is firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, or may have a fibrous texture. For consumption of unripe, pickled or cooked fruit, the mango skin may be consumed comfortably, but has potential to cause contact dermatitis (above) of the lips, gingiva or tongue in susceptible people. In ripe fruits which are commonly eaten fresh, the skin may be thicker and bitter tasting, so is typically not eaten.

Cuisine

Commercially packaged mango powder sold in clear plastic wrapping
Mangoes are widely used in cuisine. Sour, unripe mangoes are used in chutneys, athanu, pickles, or side dishes, or may be eaten raw with salt, chili, or soy sauce. A cooling summer drink called panna or panha comes from mangoes.
Ripe mangoes are typically eaten fresh; however, they can have many other culinary uses. Mango Lassi, a popular drink made throughout South Asia[citation needed], is created by mixing ripe mangoes or mango pulp with yogurt and sugar. Ripe mangoes are also used to make curries. Aamras is a popular pulp/thick juice made of mangoes with sugar or milk, and is consumed with bread, rice or pooris. The pulp from ripe mangoes is also used to make jam called ‘mangada’.
Mangoes are used in preserves like moramba, amchur (dried and powdered unripe mango) and pickles, including a spicy mustard-oil pickle. Ripe mangoes are often cut into thin layers, desiccated, folded, and then cut. These bars are similar to dried guava fruit bars available in some countries. The fruit is also added to cereal products like muesli and oat granola.

Native green mangoes from the Philippines

A basket of ripe mangoes from Bangladesh
Unripe mango may be eaten with bagoong (especially in the Philippines), fish sauce or with dash of salt. Dried strips of sweet, ripe mango (sometimes combined with seedless tamarind to form mangorind) are also popular. Mangoes may be used to make juices, mango nectar, and as a flavoring and major ingredient in ice cream and sorbetes.
Mango is used to make juices, smoothies, ice cream, fruit bars, raspados, aguas frescas, pies and sweet chili sauce, or mixed with chamoy, a sweet and spicy chili paste. It is popular on a stick dipped in hot chili powder and salt or also as a main ingredient in fresh fruit combinations. In Central America, mango is either eaten green mixed with salt, vinegar, black pepper and hot sauce, or ripe in various forms. Toasted and ground pumpkin seed (called pepita) with lime and salt are the norm when eating green mangoes. Some people also add soy sauce or chili sauce.
Pieces of mango can be mashed and used as a topping on ice cream or blended with milk and ice as milkshakes. Sweet glutinous rice is flavored with coconut, then served with sliced mango as a dessert. In other parts of Southeast Asia, mangoes are pickled with fish sauce and rice vinegar. Green mangoes can be used in mango salad with fish sauce and dried shrimp. Mango with condensed milk may be used as a topping for shaved ice.

Nutrients and phytochemicals
Mango, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy272 kJ (65 kcal)
Carbohydrates17.00 g
– Sugars14.8 g
– Dietary fiber1.8 g
Fat0.27 g
Protein0.51 g
Vitamin A equiv.38 μg (4%)
– beta-carotene445 μg (4%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1)0.058 mg (4%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)0.057 mg (4%)
Niacin (Vit. B3)0.584 mg (4%)
Pantothenic acid (B5)0.160 mg (3%)
Vitamin B60.134 mg (10%)
Folate (Vit. B9)14 μg (4%)
Vitamin C27.7 mg (46%)
Calcium10 mg (1%)
Iron0.13 mg (1%)
Magnesium9 mg (2%)
Phosphorus11 mg (2%)
Potassium156 mg (3%)
Zinc0.04 mg (0%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz) is 272 kJ (65 kcal) and that of the apple mango is slightly higher (79 kcal per 100g). Mango is rich in a variety of phytochemicals[16] and nutrients. The fruit pulp is high in prebiotic dietary fiber, vitamin C, diverse polyphenols and provitamin A carotenoids.[17]
Mango contains essential vitamins and dietary minerals. The antioxidant vitamins A, C and E compose 25%, 76% and 9% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) in a 165-gram (5.8-oz) serving. Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, 11% DRI), vitamin K (9% DRI), other B vitamins and essential nutrients, such as potassium, copper and 17 amino acids are at good levels. Mango peel and pulp contain other phytonutrients, such as the pigment antioxidants – carotenoids and polyphenols – and omega-3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.[citation needed]
Mango peel contains pigments that may have antioxidant properties,[16][18] including carotenoids, such as the provitamin A compound, beta-carotene, lutein and alpha-carotene,[19] polyphenols[20][21] such as quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, catechins, tannins, and the unique mango xanthonoid, mangiferin,[22] any of which may counteract free radicals in various disease processes as revealed in preliminary research.[23][24] Phytochemical and nutrient content appears to vary across mango species.[25] Up to 25 different carotenoids have been isolated from mango pulp, the densest of which was beta-carotene, which accounts for the yellow-orange pigmentation of most mango species.[26] Peel and leaves also have significant polyphenol content, including xanthonoids, mangiferin and gallic acid.[27]
The mango triterpene, lupeol,[28] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[29][30][31] An extract of mango branch bark called Vimang, isolated by Cuban scientists, contains numerous polyphenols with antioxidant properties in vitro[32] and on blood parameters of elderly humans.[33]
The pigment euxanthin, known as Indian yellow, is often thought to be produced from the urine of cattle fed mango leaves; the practice is described as having been outlawed in 1908 due to malnutrition of the cows and possible urushiol poisoning.[34] This supposed origin of euxanthin appears to rely on a single, anecdotal source, and Indian legal records do not outlaw such a practice.

Cultural significance

Mango roundabout, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
The mango is the national fruit of India,[36] Pakistan, and the Philippines.[37] The mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.[38]
In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection. Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of the goddess Saraswati.
Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi. Mango motifs and paisleys are widely used in different Indian embroidery styles, and are found in Kashmiri shawls, Kanchipuram silk sarees, etc. Paisleys are also common to Iranian art, because of its pre-Islamic Zoroastrian past.
In Tamilnadu, Mango is considered, along with Banana and jack fruit, as the Three royal fruits (Mukkani)
Famous Urdu poet Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib was very fond of mangoes. There are many anecdotes concerning his love for mangoes.

In Australia, where mangoes are considered to be a symbol of summer, the first tray of mangoes of the season is traditionally sold at an auction for charity

………………………………………………………………….. Click on link to read more, please

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[No. 572 Budd, haberdasher – West 47th St. – Miss Carroll – …
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Image by New York Public Library
Digital ID: 1113271. [No. 572 Budd, haberdasher – West 47th St. – Miss Carroll – Scott & Fowles, art dealers – West 48th St.]. Welles & Co. — Publisher. c1911

Source: Fifth Avenue, New York, from start to finish. (more info)

Repository: The New York Public Library. Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy.

See more information about this image and others at NYPL Digital Gallery.
Persistent URL: digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?1113271

Rights Info: No known copyright restrictions; may be subject to third party rights (for more information, click here)

[No. 550 L.P. Hollander & Co. – Dreicer & Co. – West 46th St…
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Image by New York Public Library
Digital ID: 1113269. [No. 550 L.P. Hollander & Co. – Dreicer & Co. – West 46th St. – Pickslay, jeweler – No. 572 Budd, haberdasher.]. Welles & Co. — Publisher. c1911

Source: Fifth Avenue, New York, from start to finish. (more info)

Repository: The New York Public Library. Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy.

See more information about this image and others at NYPL Digital Gallery.
Persistent URL: digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/id?1113269

Rights Info: No known copyright restrictions; may be subject to third party rights (for more information, click here)

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Mick, Toby, Dakota, Alec — Submitted by Dee in kansas city, MO
legal bud missouri
Image by humanesocietyoftheunitedstates
Reason #319,116: Mick came to us from a backyard breeder who had only one pair of Austrailian Shephers, the bloodline was very impressive. I had recently helped my 16 1/2 year old girl walk the bridge after a very long, productive life.Mick instantly fit our
family! We took him with us to the US National Championship Arabian Horse Show, along with JayJay and Hank. During the show we were in the shopping area and could not take more than a few stepps before being stopped by someone to pet the dogs. Mick was completely socialized within thrity minutes.

Unfortunately, jayJay had to be assisted across the bridge the following summer and Mick was in such mourning that we searched for another Aussie pup. Toby came to us at three months of aga to help fill that empty space that JayJay left. I had found him listed locally on Craig’s list. After numberous e-mail exchanges and telephone calls we met with his owner.
They had had the puppy only a couple weeks. After waiting for a year the young man had just
found out that his application with a legal firn in Tennessee had been accepted and they would have to make do in an apartment. They felt that it wouldn’t be the best circumstance to raise and active Aussie puppy. When he and Mick met it was like they had been bud’s from the beginning. Toby joined our growing pack in the fall of 2006.

Our German Shepherd, Hank, had been ill in 2006, having surgery to remove one of his kidneys. Once it was sent to pathology we discovered that one of his kidneys had been encapsualized in the tumor. We had Hank until the fall of 2007.

The following spring we began to look for another German Shepherd. I located Dakota on Craig’s List, when we went to meet him we took all the dogs. What we saw was a young male who had been kept chained in the backyard, with no social skills and little training. I did not see an agressive dog. We asked them to bring him out of his yeard to be introduced to the rest of the boys, Dakota was hyper, barking, etc. Mikc went up to him, gabe a couple sniffs and then turned his back and sat down completely ignoring him.

Dakota was just one of two special need German Shepherds we have taken into our family. As a member of Missouri German Shepherd Rescue I have fostered 5 outside dogs, working with them and preparing them for their forever homes. Dakota has issues with smaller dogs which we continue to work on. He loves people! Alec was our last foster who came directly from heartworm treatment and for the next month had to be kept on a leash and made to sit or lay down beside me with very little to no play time. As the worms die, there is a strong possiblity that if the dog atempes to exersise and gets
excited that a clot of dieing heartworms can block their artieries or shoot straight to the heart and kill them instantly.It was such a hard job to keep him quiet for a month. However, we built a very strong bond during that time and he adopted me. We still have issues to work on, don’t come at me with a ssquirt bottle, thinking you might be correcting him….he sees it as a threat to me. It is wiser to let me correct him by myself! Alec was a feral street dog who had no basic training, was not housebroken, was reported to be afraid of men (within an hour in our home he was in my husband’s lap). We work continually on his manners in social situations, for the most part he is a perfect gentelman, but there are sometimes when the situation just gets the best of him and we had to reestablish who is the leader. He is an absolutely regal ol’ man, who loves me and will protect me in an instant if he feels I have been threatened. We have established a very strong bond, if he is acting up all I have to do is get up shap my fingers at him and point, he will drop to the floor and usually roll over onto his back with a big grin on his face.

Adopting these dogs has givine them a home they might not otherwise have had, rules, noundries and limitations which are making them much better citizens and a joy to be around. I am very proud of my part in giving these guys a second lease on life when they might not have gotten that chance. I will continue to help those dogs who are unable to help themselves. [To submit your own reason why you love your pet, click here.]

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Maryjane 4-20-2010 (420)
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Image by Modern Scribe Photography™
Since its April 20th check out norml.org/

The Marijuana Tax Act
For more details on this topic, see Legal history of cannabis in the United States.

In the middle of the 1930s all member states in the United States had some regulation of cannabis.[7][8]. During this particular time frame, the media was swarmed with propaganda regarding the effects of marijuana. Harry J. Anslinger, a dominant leader in the prohibition against drugs, devised advertisements and commercials to inform the public of the believed side effects of marijuana. Citizens who were high on marijuana were crazy, insane, suicidal, had murderous intentions, etc. according to the propaganda [9]. Disregarding the scientific research on the subject and the falsified claims, the Marijuana Tax Act passed in 1937 quickly and with little debate and no opposition in Congress. (wiki)

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Thanks to FireDogLake for supporting the "Just Say Now" campaign and for using my image in a great article that you can find here – fdlaction.firedoglake.com/2010/07/30/where-does-your-memb…

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